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Ice Cream with pollution on top

Photo by Morgan Ashmead Frost coats every surface in the morning waiting for a fresh snowfall.

Snow treats could be slightly dangerous as pollution rises.

 

Plain City might not be having a lot of it, but snow is very common during winter. Many children use it for snowball fights and fun afternoons, that isn’t the only thing it’s used for. Snow is a very popular treat.

 

It’s a fact, almost everyone has eaten snow at some point in their life. Many students and adults continue to eat it.

 

“They’ll make snow cones on the tops of mountains,” said health teacher Aimee Sauvageau.

 

However, some people are concerned when it comes to eating snow. It isn’t just the dangers of what could be lying underneath or the dirt mixed in with the snow, it’s pollution.

 

As temperatures drop, water begins to condense and freeze in the atmosphere. Since pollution is also in the atmosphere, the snow will from with a mix of water and other chemicals. These chemicals in their pure and concentrated form are dangerous to humans.

 

Although it is dangerous, many scientists agree that the percentage of chemicals in the snow is not harmful to humans. It’s well within the safety limits.

 

“I would say breathing the running air is worse than actually eating snow,” said Sauvageau.

 

While the snow itself isn’t actually dangerous, people still need to be careful while eating the crystals.

 

“Don’t eat yellow snow, don’t eat red snow. Only eat snow that just barely fell,” said  Madeline Witkowski, member of the ski and snowboard club.

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MORGAN ASHMEAD

The author MORGAN ASHMEAD

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